How to Protect Your Basement Windows
  

Think of yourself as very fortunate if your home has window wells. Not having them is a very bad thing, since you are not allowing daylight to get inside your basement, it will be a less inviting space and a darker area.
 
Now, why is it that many homeowners who have window wells consider themselves as not lucky? Window wells could let basements be flooded since it can sometimes be filled with water. Even if it does not cause flooding, ongoing seepage can lead to problems with moisture such as bad odors and mold.
 
What is the issue?
For a lot of time in the past 50 years, rockwell window wells were created using a galvanized steel barrier that protects the window from surrounding soil and earth. The railing is open at the bottom in order to let the water out and is open at the top in order to let day light in. Since the weeping tile that routes water away can become clogged or the scattered fragments can be collected at the bottom of the window well, it can be very complicated to let the water be drained. When the water has no more places to go when it has been built up in your window well due to rain or melting of snow, it will go down into your basement.
 
At the bottom of window wells, grass and weeds can grow. They are very difficult to remove since they block out daylight and they also may it more difficult for water to drain. Not only does the galvanized steel that a number of rockwell window wells are created of can become dark and rust and make it look bad, it can also let even less light into your basement.
 
You can try the ability of draining of your window wells using a simple flood test. Place your garden hose nozzle on the bottom of your window well, make sure that it is not pointed directly at the window itself. Turn the water on for 5 seconds in full. If the water is drained in a few seconds or quickly, your drainage does not have any issues - if not, you could be dealing with a problem.
 
What is the remedy?
If the water does not drain in a matter of seconds or does not quickly drain after your flood test, you need to attend to the problem immediately before it can become problematic and have your basement being flooded.
 
Alternative new window well systems have window wells which are configurable to fit any depth of the window, and also other window wells, which satisfy the building code specification for a safe emergency exit from your basement.  For further details on how to protect your basement windows, you may visit http://kcbasementfinishing.wikia.com/wiki/Egress_Windows .
 
Clearly, there are other new solutions for your problems about window wells Consulting a professional is always recommended when it comes to solving the problem regarding your window well.